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Today is Tuesday December 12, 2017

News In Japan Time Warp. Each day, providing headlines and snippets from old newspaper articles about Japan.

In The News 110 Years Ago
April 12, 1907


JAPAN AND THE PHILIPPINES. An old "roorback" has been revived after one had reason to suppose that it had been permanently laid to rest. The rumor is that Japan desires to extend her rule southward, and to become still more an "Island Empire," or an archipelagie Power, by gaining possession of the Philippines.

STONE DISTRUSTS JAPAN: Senator Says in a Speech That She Wants the Philippines. KANSAS CITY, Mo., March 21--United States Senator William J. Stone, in the course of a speech last night at a dinner of the Knife and Fork Club here, said: "If we are ever to have serious trouble with any nation it will be Japan. Japan wants the Philippines. I am not sure whether it would not be best for all concerned if she should get them, but one thing is certain, and that is that she will never get them with our consent. But we may have trouble in keeping them. Japan would seize the archipelago in a week and we could only send over a big enough fleet to wipe Japan from the sea. That would be a huge and costly task."

AMERICA AND JAPAN: George Trumbull Ladd Protests Against Attitude of This Country. To the Editor of the New York Times--The pronouncement of Congressman Kahn respecting the moral and social characteristics of the Japanese, which has just reached this country, would be simply amusing if it could be dissociated from the circumstances amid which it occurred, and from its possible effect upon the strained relations now existing between two hitherto friendly nations. But if it is to be considered as anything more than a passing expression of ignorance and demagogy, it is calculated to evoke much more serious thoughts and feelings. As a possible influence on public sentiment and public action in the United States it is a significant indication of tendencies which may properly bring to all her citizens who know the Orient, and who wish well to their country and to all mankind, no small amount of shame and of dismay. I am simply stating a fact which admits of no doubt when I say that the recent behavior of individual Americans has discredited and disgraced the whole Nation of America in this part of the world.

SCHMITZ TO GIVE WAY IF COOLIES ARE BARRED: San Francisco Mayor and Other Officials in Washington. TO SEE PRESIDENT TO-DAY Mayor Says He and His Party Will Make Concessions If They Are for the Country's Good. WASHINGTON, Feb 8.--The San Francisco officials arrived here this evening, not at all bellicose. Mayor Schmitz heads the party. As soon as the party arrived Representatives Hayes and Kahn notified the President and Secretary Root, and the San Franciscans went to a hotel and waited a summons to the White House or to the State Department. They will be received by the President to-morrow. The Mayor, who did the talking for the delegation, was in a calm and pacific frame of mind. He said: "We have come to Washington with a free mind to discuss the school in question with President Roosevelt. The mere fact that we have responded to the President's invitation is sufficient evidence that we stand ready to make concessions if we are convinced that by so doing the entire country will profit by our action. No Californian is willing to stand on any technicality that will work to the detriment of the Nation. It would be unfair for us to go into a full and free discussion of the questions involved until we have conferred with Mr. Roosevelt. We have not excluded the Japanese children from the schools of San Francisco, but since the fire the School Board has found it necessary to adopt the policy of segregation, not exclusion, in the primary and intermediate departments. The law of California makes it question of segregation discretionary with the school boards in the various towns and cities of the State. The law reads that the school authorities 'may' segregate the children of the white and Mongolian races, and requires that when the separate schools have been established the children of the two races must attend the schools set apart for them. After the fire we found that the Japanese were crowding the white children out of the schools, and the only course to pursue was to take advantage of the State law and establish the separate schools. This was done. The white children took the places of the Japanese in the white schools and Oriental schools were established for the Japanese. That is the whold store in a nutshell."

WANT JAPAN'S HONOR GUARDED: Mikado's Subjects Oppose Any Treaty Restricting Immigration. TOKIO, Feb 8.--While ignoring the anti-Japanese feeling in a portion of the American press, the Japanese public is almost unanimous in demanding that the solution of the San Francisco school question must not involve the labor question. A mutual treaty restricting the immigration of laborers is condemned here as a one-sided concession, sacrificing Japan's honor without any recompense whatever. It is felt that nothing derogatory to the national honor, however slight, must be admitted in the deplomatic relation of the two nations.


1. Ladd, George Trumbull (March 22, 1907). "AMERICA AND JAPAN: George Trumbull Ladd Protests Against Attitude of This Country". The New York Times. p 7.
2. March 22, 1907. "STONE DISTRUSTS JAPAN". The New York Times. p 4.
3. Special to The New York Times (February 9, 1907). "SCHMITZ TO GIVE WAY IF COOLIES ARE BARRED: San Francisco Mayor and Other Officials in Washington. TO SEE PRESIDENT TO-DAY Mayor Says He and His Party Will Make Concessions If They Are for the Country's Good". The New York Times. p 3. February 9, 1907. "WANT JAPAN'S HONOR GUARDED: Mikado's Subjects Oppose Any Treaty Restricting Immigration". The New York Times. p 3.
4. April 6, 1907. "JAPAN AND THE PHILIPPINES". The New York Times. p 6.


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